4 tips for Assigned Certifiers…

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The following short posts were submitted by a registered architect to help others negotiate through implementation issues associated with BC(A)R SI.9

4 tips for Assigned Certifiers…

1. Set up an online ARCHIVE for records, you’ll need to keep this for at least 6 years and to be able to search the documents, photos and drawings by date, contents, supplier etc.

2, Make a record of EVERYONE (person or company) who will be signing Ancillary Certs, including their qualifications, areas of competence, contact details, company registration, PI insurance etc.

“Competent Person: a person is deemed to be a competent person where, having regard to the task he or she is required to perform and taking account of the size and/or complexity of the project, the person possesses sufficient training, experience and knowledge appropriate to the nature of the work to be undertaken”

3. CHECK all design drawings, specifications and certificates that you receive for compliance and make a record of your check. If the design is outside your field get someone else to check.

KEEP YOUR NERVE. If something is not compliant or if you don’t have all the information don’t rush into signing off or sending out a Certificate under pressure.

Other posts of interest:

4 things I am putting in my fee agreements– click link here

4 tips for Design Certifiers…  – click link here

7 posts all architects (surveyors + engineers) should read – click link here

 

 

0 thoughts on “4 tips for Assigned Certifiers…

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  4. Andrew Alexander MRIAI

    It would appear from the above definition of competency that no Assigned Certifier can claim to be competent. No building professional has ever before acted in this capacity hence how can they claim to “possesses sufficient training, experience and knowledge appropriate to the nature of the work to be undertaken”?

    In addition one could argue that while all other parties to a contract can merely claim to be competent the judgment of the Assigned Certifier must be ‘perfect’ in order to sign-off, approve and stand over all of this ‘competent’ work.

    Another observation form the above tips is that they are all related to administration, collecting paperwork and keeping files – all the while attempting to construct a defence for the day that a law suit comes through the letter box. So in addition to being a perfect architect the Assigned Certifier must also be a perfect librarian – and in that they will be in competition with the BCMS.

    Where in the midst of all of this does the Assigned Certifier find time to actually do their inspections? And who out there is writing inspection tips for Certifiers? The purchaser will be buying a building. The client will be commissioning a building not a beautiful set of archived files.

    In Northern Ireland documents are submitted to building Control who after appraising them (not unlike Fire officers) and perhaps requesting amendments stamps them approved (not unlike Fire Certificates). The documents then become one of the reference points (along with the building regulations themselves – because a set of drawings are not the Regulations per se) to which the building during its construction and during its occupation must be brought up to standard and kept in compliance.

    Thereafter a majority of the energy can be focused on physical inspection – both by the competent professional and the Local Authority Building Control Officer (who is also a competent professional). Physical inspection backed by the weight of statutory legislation is the only activity which is going to achieve the objectives set out by the Minister himself in his recent statement i.e.

    “Add clarity, efficiency and consistency to building control activities across the local government sector.”

    “Will lead to improved quality within the construction sector”

    Not perfection but ‘improved quality’. Not the most beautiful and perfect archive that can be created by civil servants and professionals but ‘improved quality’ in the field.

    Reply
  5. Andrew Alexander MRIAI

    It would appear from the above definition of competency that no Assigned Certifier can claim to be competent. No building professional has ever before acted in this capacity hence how can they claim to “possesses sufficient training, experience and knowledge appropriate to the nature of the work to be undertaken”?

    In addition one could argue that while all other parties to a contract can merely claim to be competent the judgment of the Assigned Certifier must be ‘perfect’ in order to sign-off, approve and stand over all of this ‘competent’ work.

    Another observation form the above tips is that they are all related to administration, collecting paperwork and keeping files – all the while attempting to construct a defence for the day that a law suit comes through the letter box. So in addition to being a perfect architect the Assigned Certifier must also be a perfect librarian – and in that they will be in competition with the BCMS.

    Where in the midst of all of this does the Assigned Certifier find time to actually do their inspections? And who out there is writing inspection tips for Certifiers? The purchaser will be buying a building. The client will be commissioning a building not a beautiful set of archived files.

    In Northern Ireland documents are submitted to building Control who after appraising them (not unlike Fire officers) and perhaps requesting amendments stamps them approved (not unlike Fire Certificates). The documents then become one of the reference points (along with the building regulations themselves – because a set of drawings are not the Regulations per se) to which the building during its construction and during its occupation must be brought up to standard and kept in compliance.

    Thereafter a majority of the energy can be focused on physical inspection – both by the competent professional and the Local Authority Building Control Officer (who is also a competent professional). Physical inspection backed by the weight of statutory legislation is the only activity which is going to achieve the objectives set out by the Minister himself in his recent statement i.e.

    “Add clarity, efficiency and consistency to building control activities across the local government sector.”

    “Will lead to improved quality within the construction sector”

    Not perfection but ‘improved quality’. Not the most beautiful and perfect archive that can be created by civil servants and professionals but ‘improved quality’ in the field.

    Reply

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